archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

This awesome sculpture is a fully-functioning pipe organ made of 250 empty Pringles cans. It was created by Brooklyn-based mixed-media artist collective Fall On Your Sword, who explain that their inspiration for the project came from the organ seen in The Goonies.

Will Bates, cofounder of Fall On Your Sword, explains how the Pringles organ works:

"We built ten keys below the organ’s pipes by connecting the cans to springs. Pushing a key triggers a tone, causing air generated by hidden fans within the tubes to flow out of the pipes at the top of the organ. "We want the piece to feel like a real instrument, so the tones will be based on manipulated recordings of organ tones and resonances played through the cans themselves. Participants can make up their own tune, and have their own unique experience with the piece."

Click here for video of the Pringles organ in action.

[via Junkculture]

lostbeasts
griseus:

Skeletal reconstruction of the new Chilean Crested Penguin Eudyptes calauina showing the identified elements; and size comparison with the Macaroni penguin E. chrysolophus and the Yellow-eyed penguin Megadyptes antipodes 
Illustration by Martin Chavez
Reference (Open Access) Chávez Hoffmeister et al (2014) The Evolution of Seabirds in the Humboldt Current: New Clues from the Pliocene of Central Chile. PLoS ONE 9.

griseus:

Skeletal reconstruction of the new Chilean Crested Penguin Eudyptes calauina showing the identified elements; and size comparison with the Macaroni penguin E. chrysolophus and the Yellow-eyed penguin Megadyptes antipodes 

theremina

m1k3y:

love-3000:

prostheticknowledge:

The Sword of Damocles

Early pioneering tech from 1968 is a stereoscopic headmounted display created by Ivan Sutherland, the first Virtual Reality technology:

Computer graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland models a stereoscopic display he created at Harvard using miniature TV tubes. An early application showed a three-dimensional wire-frame virtual room that users could explore by moving their heads.

I couldn’t locate a demonstration of the wireframe rooms (but if anyone knows … let me know!)

Images above are from the Computer History Museum here and here

Papers written by Ivan Sutherland from 1965 on the subject can be found here and here

〰 Wow, I didn’t know it was that small already! In 1968!

Hail the Godfather